24: Is Vinyl Worth The Effort?

BY: THOMAS DEVOY

With digital sales on the decline, a new generation of millennials are now embracing LPs, saving vinyl at the last possible second from falling into tech obscurity. In December 2015, the Crowsley suitcase record player was the most purchased product on amazon.

Throwing the audio quality argument out of the window, experiencing an album on vinyl is a hands-on, and often a very personal, listening experience that streaming just can't match. Plus the album art is incredible. 

Also, here's a picture of my vinyl setup in case you care.

Also, here's a picture of my vinyl setup in case you care.

Here's my quick argument as to why you should press your album to vinyl: 

Amateur Audiophiles.

Now if you're an audiophile, you wouldn't touch that player with a ten foot pole. But that's not the point. This increase in sales of entry level record players is an indication that new people are getting into vinyl collecting. As a band, that should be really exciting. 

Physical products are still a band's best bet to making money, and the market is screaming vinyl.

Price Point.

A bummer is that you have to buy a minimum number of copies, which could end up being a big chunk of change. You'll need to build up a fan base enough to know that you'll be able to sell 200 or more copies. But once you are in that place, it could be very lucrative for your band.

Vinyl is relatively cheap when you break it down to cost per unit, and is sold at a premium price. This allows you to make a ton of money with every record sold. Plus, you're giving your fans a product they want and allowing them an outlet to support you financially. 


Thomas DeVoy // Creative Director, Urban Geographer. Connect with him on social media at @DeVoy_Thomas.

Thomas DeVoy // Creative Director, Urban Geographer. Connect with him on social media at @DeVoy_Thomas.